This is the second in a two-part series on Roth IRAs. The first part reviewed the basics of Roth IRAs. Read on to learn more.

There are many parts to an Estate Plan. The Revocable Trust is just one part. It’s important to coordinate the various parts of the Estate Plan. Read on to learn more.

Roth IRAs can be a great planning strategy. They can save taxes and help in many ways. Read on to learn more.

Trustee distribution standards could be very broad. “Health, education, maintenance, and support” is such a standard, which has its origin in tax regulations. Read on to learn more.

A revocable trust is treated the same as the individual for most purposes. But for some narrow purposes it can be treated differently. Read on to learn more.

The Academy takes learning seriously. The Academy’s Spring Summit included numerous substantive legal education sessions, as well as sessions on marketing and law office management. The virtual conference also included opportunities for networking and fun. Read on to learn more.

The Heckerling conference, the largest conference for Estate Planning in the country, occurred recently. Many of the thought leaders in Estate Planning and Elder Law got together and discussed recent developments and new strategies. Read on to learn more.

The Academy takes learning seriously. The Academy’s Spring Summit included numerous substantive legal education sessions, as well as sessions on marketing and law office management. The virtual conference also included opportunities for networking and fun. Read on to learn more.

ABLE accounts are a nice, flexible way to supplement the usefulness of a Special Needs Trust. But certain limits apply. Read on to learn more.

There is a great deal of legislation pending and much is uncertain. But this much is certain, the estate tax exclusion will go down by half beginning 2026 under current law. Now is the time to plan for your clients and yourself. Read on to learn more.

Tax proposals would increase capital gains rates, among other things. These proposed changes could make a Charitable Remainder Trust look even better. A Charitable Remainder Trust can earn the donor an income tax deduction upfront and defer gains on its sale of assets. Read on to learn more.

Senators Sanders and Whitehouse have introduced legislation in the Senate which would significantly alter the Estate Planning landscape. It would dramatically change the tools we use to plan for our clients. Time is of the essence. Read on to learn more.

Clients often come to an Estate Planning attorney with specific ideas in their minds. The attorney’s role is to counsel them regarding their plan, not just to draw up documents to accomplish it. Read on to learn more.

The amount you can pass free from estate tax is at a record high of $11.7 million per person. There’s legislation which would lower the exclusion to $3.5 million per person. Married people can take advantage of the current exemption. Read on to learn more.

Clients are often most concerned about how to dispose of their tangible personal property, i.e., their “stuff.” Often even wealthy clients are most concerned with the things around them rather than their financial accounts. What’s the best way to handle the “stuff”? Read on to learn more.

The pandemic has been difficult for many of us, including some Estate Planning attorneys. Sometimes it’s difficult to follow all the news. But, there’s little-known pandemic relief for employers struggling from the pandemic. Read on to learn more.

Disclaimers can be a good way of getting assets where you want them to go. If the disclaimer is a “qualified disclaimer,” the client isn’t treated as having made a taxable gift. Sometimes a “double disclaimer” is necessary to achieve the desired outcome. Read on to learn more.

Why do you have a “Last Will and Testament.” Even Estate Planning attorneys are unlikely to know the etymology of the term. It was the subject of a recent question on “Jeopardy.” Read on to learn more.

Disclaimers can be a good way of getting assets where you want them to go. If the disclaimer is a “qualified disclaimer,” the client isn’t treated as having made a taxable gift. This can be a great result for the client in the right circumstances. Read on to learn more.

beneficiary

Beneficiary designations can be deceptively simple. But their simplicity is sort of like an iceberg. Danger lurks beneath those tranquil waters, both for the client and the attorney. Designations for IRAs and retirement plans can be particularly complicated, especially after the SECURE Act. This article examines how beneficiary designations done prior to the SECURE Act might not have the intended consequences today. Read on to learn more.

beneficiary

Beneficiary designations can be deceptively simple. But their simplicity is sort of like an iceberg. Danger lurks beneath those tranquil waters, both for the client and the attorney. Designations for IRAs and retirement plans can be particularly complicated, especially after the SECURE Act. This article focuses on beneficiaries who don’t fall under the standard 10-year payout of the SECURE Act. Read on to learn more.

beneficiary

Beneficiary designations can be deceptively simple. You simply designate the person to whom you want the assets to go. But their simplicity is sort of like an iceberg. Danger lurks beneath those tranquil waters, both for the client and the attorney. Read on to learn more.

beneficiary

Beneficiary designations can be deceptively simple. But their simplicity is sort of like an iceberg. Danger lurks beneath those tranquil waters, both for the client and the attorney. Designations for IRAs and retirement plans can be particularly complicated, especially after the SECURE Act. This article focuses on the basics of the SECURE Act. Read on to learn more.

trust

As we approach the end of the year, it’s a good time to think about updating your plan. This includes your entire …

estate planning

As we approach the end of the year, it’s a good time to think about updating your plan. This includes your entire …

public charity

Normally, you must itemize your deductions in order to benefit from them. In 2020, the standard deduction amount is $12,400 for individuals …

tax planning

Planning is important for your income taxation during life as well as for any estate tax at death. Even though 2021 is …

When you’re deciding how your assets should be divided at death, sometimes dividing them equally is the appropriate choice. But, sometimes it’s not. Fair isn’t always equal or vice versa. Read on to learn more, including how to avoid a challenge if you choose an unequal division among your children.

This is the second in a three-part series of articles on Powers of Attorney. The first article examined the Financial Power of Attorney. This second article examines the Healthcare Power of Attorney and Advance Directive.

Powers of Attorney are part of even the simplest estate plan. A Power of Attorney allows your Agent to act for you. There are Powers of Attorney for financial matters and also those for health care. This article concerns the Healthcare Powers of Attorney and Advance Directives.

Powers of Attorney are part of even the simplest estate plan. A Power of Attorney allows your Agent to act for you. There are Powers of Attorney for financial matters and also those for health care.

There is more to estate planning than disposing of your assets after your death. Planning for your incapacity is just as important. Read on to learn more about how incapacity planning can save you and your loved ones' anxiety.

We are happy to report that COVID-19 has not hindered our ability to deliver quality legal services and to serve our community …

The SECURE Act passed in late December. The SECURE Act changes some lifetime rules, but the biggest change concerns rules for beneficiaries. Read on to learn more.

When planning for children with special needs, it takes special care to preserve their eligibility for public benefits. An ABLE account is a new way to preserve eligibility while gaining tax advantages. Read on to learn more about this new tool in planning for those who were disabled by age 26.

What’s the right direction for you in planning for future medical expenses? The odds are even that you’ll need long-term care (LTC) after age 65, at least for a while. Here are possible paths for covering those potential costs. How Are You Planning for Long-Term Care (LTC) Expenses?